caching proxy server for windows 8

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caching proxy server for windows 8 – Managing your servers can streamline the performance of your team by allowing them to complete complex tasks faster. Plus, it can enable them to detect problems early on before they get out of hand and compromise your business. As a result, the risk of experiencing operational setbacks is drastically lower.

But the only way to make the most of your server management is to perform it correctly. And to help you do so, this article will share nine tips on improving your server management and fix some problem about windows, http-proxy, , , .

I need to setup a local caching proxy server on windows 8 so I can cache some web contents to both speed up page loads and prevent our low quality internet connection from letting us down every now and then.

in our country even some js & css files on the Google search page are censored due to our government’s sick policies! I can load these files using vpn connections but sometimes they even interrupt vpn connections (and other ways of going around the censorship).

I used to use squid proxy for windows a long time ago, but it seems that development of squid for windows has been stalled for a long time now.

Are there any better options than the old squid server for windows?

Solution :

Yesterday I tried CCProxy http://www.youngzsoft.net/ccproxy/
Try that too..

Try Polipo
http://www.pps.univ-paris-diderot.fr/~jch/software/polipo/

Download Windows binaries from https://archive.torproject.org/tor-package-archive/polipo/

I’ve used it and it’s good.

The officially sanctioned MS product for this purpose is MS Forefront Threat Management Gateway (formerly ISA Server). It will do this, plus quite a bit more, which makes it overkill. And it’s pricey.

Having said that, someone did create a native port of Squid 2.7 to Windows. http://squid.acmeconsulting.it/Squid27.html

I’ve tried Squid (Windows edition) and CCProxy. Both are fine options but the detour using these applications make them redundant unless you’re managing a 100+ client network. Recently I even left OpenDNS because I realized that my ISP wasn’t filtered/censored so there wasn’t any need to jump another hoop. It basically boils down to what ISP services you have, the number of clients, and what you need. Do some ipconfig and tracert commands, and check out if access to websites still work.

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