Does traffic policing reduce transmission speed or it reduces the speed of the interface in which it was configured?

Posted on

Does traffic policing reduce transmission speed or it reduces the speed of the interface in which it was configured? – Managing your servers can streamline the performance of your team by allowing them to complete complex tasks faster. Plus, it can enable them to detect problems early on before they get out of hand and compromise your business. As a result, the risk of experiencing operational setbacks is drastically lower.

But the only way to make the most of your server management is to perform it correctly. And to help you do so, this article will share nine tips on improving your server management and fix some problem about linux, networking, , , .

I have a question about traffic policing and more specifically, related to traffic control (tc) in Linux. I’m not too familiar with networking, so please excuse my technical terms.

I have configured eth0 of my Linux test server (within LAN) to police incoming traffic to 56kbits. I then fired up WinSCP on my client and try copying a 10MB file to the test server. speed is indeed reduced to 56kbits.

In situation like these, does that mean that my even when I’m on a 100Mbits network, my transmission speed between client and server is only at 56kbits? Or is eth0 slows in accepting the incoming packets?

Solution :

Don’t you answer your own question?

my Linux test server (within LAN)

does that mean that my even when I’m on a 100Mbits network

Isn’t your LAN test server on at least a 100Mbits network…?

However: Traffic shaping does not influence the network on layer 2. Your NIC will continue to accept packets at 100Mbit/s. But every traffic (of the shaped type) above the configured limit will be thrown away by the shaper. This gets detected (so far the theory) on higher levels (TCP or the UDP application) so that the communication partners reduce the amount of data they send respectively.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.